Fantasy Webcomics For Your Magic-Loving Heart

I’ve blogged about my favorite fantasy webcomics before, but I just keep finding more! It’s not my fault! Someone created the internet, and then all these amazing artists and writers came along and filled it up with webcomics (and cats). So here’s another round of the fantasy webcomics that have eaten both my time and the battery power on my tablet. Happy reading!

A helpful webcomics reading tip: many creators sell PDFs or hard copies for affordable prices. That can be an easier for long stories and lets you read without an internet connection. So if you get sucked in, but all the clicking gets tiring, check around their sites for buying options.

(New to my blog? All my comics recommendations are here, or check out my comics Pinterest board.)

Full Circle by Taneka Stotts and Christianne Goudreau, colored by Genue Revuelta

Status: Ongoing, about 30 pages

What it’s about: “Full Circle is a fantasy/adventure webcomic that follows Elsa and Rhadi on their adventures through the world of Ves. One wants to go home while the other wants to be anywhere but.”

Why I love it: For “sucking in the reader” I give these folks an A+. Everybody has wings but this one guy, who often locks himself in his room doing magic and hearing voices. We know from the very first page that something bad happens to his younger sister. Is it connected to his magic experiments? Why doesn’t he have wings? Whose voice is he hearing? So! Many! Questions! The art is clear and pretty, and the lettering is quite skillful. The cast is diverse. A solid start that has me curious to see what’s next!

Sfeer Theory by Jayd “Chira” Aït-Kaci and Alex “Muun” Singer

Status: Ongoing, about 140 pages

What it’s about: “It’s the eighteenth century of the Imperial Calender and the Empire of Warassa is at its peak. Spanning a full continent, and experiencing a new mastery of the magic known as the principles of Sfeer Theory, one might go so far as to call Warassa the center of the world. However, prosperity comes at a cost. Day by day, tensions rise at the borders of the Empire, which may soon be bound for war. Not that Luca Valentino knows that last part. A lab technician at the Empire’s premier school, Uitspan Academy, Luca desires only to live quietly to further educate himself in the nature of Sfeer Theory. This may not be so simple, for as he learns more about the magic around him, he finds himself entangled in a great mystery, one which may involve the whole of the world as he knows it…”

Why I love it: It’s just so gorgeous. The body language is so well drawn. The colors are muted and rich. I love the panels which highlight just one thing, such as a hand or a pair of feet skidding to a stop in the snow. The political conspiracy drama is engrossing. I was fascinated by the magic system as well, especially as Luca’s talent is revealed. This would make an amazing feature length animated movie! I’ve just realized that the first two parts are available as ebooks, so I’ll be picking those up shortly so it’s easier to re-read.

Suihira: The City of Water by Riana Dorsey

Status: Ongoing, about 75 pages

What it’s about: “Legend has it that somewhere on this miserable, ocean-less desert planet, the water goddess, Akia, had created ‘Suihira,’ a city that sits above an enormous glacial lake. If you prove yourself devoted to Akia, she will lead you there, where you can have all the water you can drink… or so the myth goes. The truth is, the people of the desert know better. They know Akia abandoned humanity centuries ago. Wahida isn’t convinced. Leaving behind her life, her family, and even her identity, Wahida journeys across the desert landscape on the search for the legendary City of Water… not knowing she’ll discover more than she expected.”

Why I love it: I adore how Dorsey overlays large scenes with smaller, hand-drawn panels with soft borders. Her characters have large animated eyes, and she’s great with facial expressions. The desert and palace color schemes are gorgeous. Wahida is young and can be intolerant of people who don’t believe as she does – but to be fair, it’s tough to be a teenager when your whole family dismisses something you deeply care about. I’m guessing part of her journey will be about her own growth, as much as it’s about finding the city. I’m looking forward to more of her tale.

Vattu by Evan Dahm

Status: Book 1 is complete with 270 pages. Book 2 is complete with 402 pages. Book 3 is ongoing with about 150 pages.

What it’s about: “Vattu is a story following a member of a nomadic tribe caught in the midst of a massive clash of cultures.”

Why I love it: Dahm says he does long-form storytelling, and he means it. This is epic fantasy, in an a immense world, with a large cast that Dahm introduces incrementally so the reader has time to learn everyone. I usually need to bond with at least one character to like a book, and I’m not sure that I have in Vattu, and yet I’m still reading. I’m just so fascinated by all the cultures clashing, the political intrigue, and what’s going to happen to everyone. There are many strong female characters, and I appreciate that so much as well.

White Noise by Adrien Lee a.k.a. thephooka

Status: Ongoing, about 225 pages

What it’s about: “In the early 1900s, the nation of Aetheri came out of its long interdimensional isolation and revealed to the humans of the Symphony Archipelago that they were not alone in the multiverse. Things swiftly got ugly after that. In the early 1990s, Aetheri’s leadership changed, and in the Archipelago, a tiny broken family of half-siblings banded together in the face of the bile and hate that was boiling up between the humans and the non-humans. In the early 2000s, that family was split apart. Hawk Press and his sister Liya Kiski both begin a long and exhaustive journey towards understanding the difference between friend and enemy–and between the family you’re given, and the family you make.”

Why I love it: The long conflict between humans and non-humans here feels so heavy. You don’t really know who to trust, although definitely don’t trust the reports on the radio. Hawk’s and Liya’s stories are both interesting, so you’re not just waiting to see if they can reunite somehow. It’s pretty complex, so I’m currently re-reading it to make sure I have all the players straight in my head. It’s possibly even better the second time around.

The Substitutes by Myisha Haynes

Status: Ongoing, about 20 pages so far

What it’s about: “What happens when three roommates accidentally acquire powerful magic weapons destined for someone else? What happens when the aforementioned “someone elses” fall from grace and public favor in the aftermath? What happens when you’ve suddenly found yourself as the hero to someone else’s story…?”

Why I love it: Intensely detailed, beautiful art. A fantasy world that’s not a replica of European history. A diverse cast. A mysterious intro. This is a new webcomic and I can’t wait to read more.

And those are my latest favorite fantasy webcomics! If you have any suggestions, please leave them in the comments – and thanks for sharing this post on social media or with friends, so more people can find these great books!

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